Dancing to Dirges

Depressing and happy things Tim says, sometimes while drunk

Wednesday, June 11, 2008

I can relate to that

Work is slow, so I'm reading my Access manual. One of the problems with my job is that my skill set is so narrow that I'm pretty much unmarketable to other companies. Plus, people we hire have to learn our ridiculously outdated software. So I'm trying to learn a little something.

Now, of course, I'm imagining a table of all my characters, related to scene records which are populated with time stamps and summaries, and then a query where I can call up a certain time in the narrative and see where everyone is, and what they're doing. That seems like a great idea, right? Right?

6 Comments:

At 4:06 PM , Anonymous Tacit Hydra said...

YES. Yes, do this wonderful, wonderful thing.

 
At 5:20 PM , Blogger colin said...

The question is, would it actually work better than a wall of post-its or a table covered with index cards.

Programmer: n. A person who will spend all day writing a script to automate something they could have done in two seconds.

 
At 8:41 PM , Blogger Splitcoil said...

I've often thought i2's Analyst Notebook would make a great tool for a novelist. It's a little pricy, though. Has nice timeline functions in addition to everything else.

http://www.i2inc.com/

 
At 10:38 PM , Anonymous Scott Janssens said...

Access!? Baby Jeebus weeps!

 
At 6:18 AM , Blogger Tim Akers said...

Scott, my friend, you must understand. Currently all my data work is done in a DOS version of Borland dBase IV. So yes, let the baby cry, but I'm learning Access.

 
At 8:25 AM , Anonymous Mike A said...

Speaking as someone who's been trying to develop plot-visualising software on and off for a couple of years, I don't recommend getting into it - not if you want to get any writing done, anyway!

Lately I've been investigating personal wikis like ConnectedText. Seems like a useful tool for note-taking/world-building - though it wouldn't do what you're talking about (at least, it wouldn't naturally lend itself to the job).

 

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